Contracts and Policies

Contracts and Policies
Residence Hall Contracts & Policies

Residence hall students owing money on their Housing and Dining account will receive an electronic "Notice of Payment Due", showing the amount due and the due dates. Residents who have a past due account will receive an electronic "Notice of Overdue Account". This will be found in myWSU. Overdue accounts are subject to a late fee.

Checkouts at the end of fall semester must be completed before you leave campus. For all contract terminations please refer to your Housing and Dining Financial Contract to obtain our policy on charges and refunds. All residents must verify their intention to terminate their contract by clicking on the myHousing Contract link and accessing their online contract prior to termination. A checkout is not valid unless the online termination process is completed correctly and the requested termination is approved by Housing Services. Failure to receive approval from Housing Services to terminate the contract will result in additional charges.

If you are currently living in a residence hall and wish to move to either another hall or another room, see your Residential Education Director. Once your request has been received, we will look on our waiting list to determine if other assignment changes are ahead of you and to determine space availability. If space is available, you will receive a hall transfer card authorizing your move. The new room will be assigned to you and you'll be given a date which you must complete the move by. You need to check-out properly from your current space, which involves turning in keys to your front desk and completing the room inventory agreement. View your my.wsu.edu account balance due for cost changes.

Failure to complete this process properly may result in charges to your account. If you have questions, please ask your Residential Education Director.

Single Student Apartments Contracts & Policies

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Applications for the 2017-2018 academic year are available now.

Additional Contracts

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Family/Graduate Student Contracts & Policies

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Freshman Live-in Rule

The Washington Administrative Code (WAC 504-24-030) requires all single undergraduate freshmen under 20 years of age to live in organized living groups which are officially recognized by the university (residence halls, fraternities and sororities) for one academic year.

The policy is based on the belief, substantiated by national and local data regarding the benefits of living in freshman-approved housing, that our living and learning environments offer the highest educational value to students. Further, there is a decided interest in the education, well-being, health, safety and convenience of all our students. Irrespective of religion, ethnicity, race, lifestyle, gender or ability, our students benefit from interaction with other students as well as the academic and social support services offered by our residence life staff.

Exemptions will be considered when a student demonstrates to the Department of Residence Life that:

  1. The student has attended an institution of higher education (post high school graduation) as a regularly enrolled student for at least two regular semesters or three regular quarters, excluding summer sessions. Running Start students are considered freshmen with college credits, not regularly enrolled students, and are subject to the live-in requirements.
  2. The student is living with immediate family in a family situation. Mother and/or father, legal guardian, aunt or uncle, or grandparents only qualify as "immediate family." Immediate family must live within a 40 mile radius of the WSU Pullman campus.
  3. The student can demonstrate they have a documented medical or psychological condition that clearly shows living in on-campus student housing would have a detrimental effect on the student’s physical health and/or emotional wellbeing.

    Required Documentation:
    a). The complete Freshman Live-in Rule Verification of Disability/Chronic Health Condition filled out by a licensed medical provider.  All questions must be answered by the medical provider.  Incomplete forms will not be considered.
    b). The Freshman Live-in Rule Student Personal Statement

  4. The student can demonstrate that living in recognized University housing would cause undue financial hardship. Committee decisions are based on the inability to pay for housing. Choosing to not take out student loans that are offered is not considered an undue financial hardship.

Applications for permission to reside off campus are available from the Department of Residence Life, PO Box 641724, Pullman, WA  99164-1724. Applications are reviewed, and a determination is made whether an exemption will be granted. Individuals applying for such exemption will be informed of the decision in writing via email.  Do not sign a lease until you have received written notification of approval.  A signed lease does not preclude you from the Freshmen Live-in Rule.

If a student feels that the decision was not in accordance with Residence Life policy or the law, or if there is new information which might reasonably impact the decision, students may request a review of the decision by submitting a written appeal to the office of the Dean of Students (deanofstudents@wsu.edu). The appeal should include any new documentation or information that would be relevant. The office of the Dean of Students will review the information and an appeal decision will be sent to the student via email.

Waiver Form here-The Freshman Live-in Rule Waiver form

This PDF form can be completed on your computer. Once your information is entered print the form, then mail or fax it to the office indicated on the bottom of the form.

If you are found to be eligible for this waiver, you are still responsible for all penalty fees as a result of breaking your contract.


Need help with the form? Download the Freshman Live-in Rule Housing Waiver Instructions

First Year Focus/Academic Theme Options
 

First-Year Focus and Academic Theme living options are living-learning communities in specific Washington State University residence halls. Through First-Year Focus, entering first year students select, with their Summer ALIVE advisor, a First-Year Focus course that they will take with a cohort of other first year students living in their hall. In Academic Theme living communities students with similar interests live together in a residence hall.

First-Year Focus enables freshmen to enjoy the benefits of living with other students with whom they share a course.

Benefits of First-Year Focus and Academic Theme living options

Assessment results have shown that choosing an Academic Theme living option or participating in First-Year Focus has resulted in these advantages:

  • Highest levels of student satisfaction with their residence hall and university experience.
  • More contact with faculty
  • Introduction to more campus resources
  • Better retention between school years
  • More out-of-class conversations about shared academic interests
  • Easier formation of study groups
  • New first-year friendships that include academic interests
  • Greatest educational benefit from room and board costs


For information about your course requirements please check your residence hall web page.

Frequently Asked Questions about Freshman Focus and Academic Theme Living Option

I don't have a major--how will participating in Freshman Focus or an Academic Theme Living option help me?

The courses offered in Freshman Focus work toward satisfying Washington State University's University Common Requirements (UCORE) or General Education Requirements (GERs), which all students must complete to graduate. If you select a specific academic theme living option, you will be involved in Freshman Focus (in most halls) as well as living with students who have similar academic interests.

How does participating in Freshman Focus or an Academic Theme Living option affect my major if I already have one?

Since the classes included in Freshman Focus are applicable to satisfying University Core Requirement or General Education Requirements, they will help toward graduation. The Freshman Focus course you select will provide numerous benefits of sharing that class with other students where you live, such as being easily able to form study groups and to talk about ideas from your class, as well as having additional contact with course faculty and campus resources.

If I choose an Academically Themed Living option with Freshman Focus classes am I registered for all my classes?

No. Most students should be enrolled for 15 to18 credit hours per semester to progress toward a timely graduation. Your Freshman Focus classes will provide you with only 3 to 4 credits. When you meet with your academic advisor during Summer ALIVE orientation you'll discuss courses to complete your schedule and your registration.

I will bring Advanced Placement or Running Start credits I have already earned; how will this affect my Freshman Focus participation?

Your Summer ALIVE advisor will help you determine if one of the Freshman Focus courses in your hall will still be appropriate for you.

I may join the Honors College, what are the implications of that for my choice of living options?

The Honors College students have a different curriculum from the University Core Requirements and General Education Requirements. As a result of this, Honors College participants will not have a Freshman Focus option. Students who plan to join the Honors College should give preference to the Scholars Halls (Scott and Coman) or Honors Hall for their residence to enjoy the benefits of sharing other Honors College classes with their living group members.

Won't participating in Freshman Focus classes keep me from meeting other people?

No. Not only will you make friends faster within your hall because you share a class, but you will also still have the opportunity to make friends outside your Freshman Focus class and your theme living group. You will be living among other students in your residence hall who don't share that class.  You will also meet people in other classes who are not a part of your Freshman Focus group.

What courses are offered in each hall?

First-Year Focus Classes by Hall for Fall 2017

Every hall has at least two First-Year Focus course that provide options appropriate for any major. The courses for Fall 2017 are below.

Community/Duncan Dunn: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT] or Human Development 101: Human Development across the Lifespan [SSCI].  These courses are shared with other Hillside residence halls.

Gannon/Goldsworthy: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT], English 101: Composition [WRTG], or Human Development 205:  Developing Effective Communication and Life Skills [COMM].

Global Scholars: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT] or Contemporary Ethnic Studies 101: Introduction to Comparative Ethnic Studies [DIVR]. These courses are shared with neighboring Northside Hall.

Elmina White Honors: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT] or Human Development 101: Human Development across the Lifespan [SSCI].  These courses are shared with other Hillside residence halls.

McCroskey Hall: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT] or Human Development 101: Human Development across the Lifespan [SSCI].  These courses are shared with other Hillside residence halls.

McEachern: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT] or Fine Arts 101: Introduction to Art [ARTS]. These courses are shared with neighboring Olympia Hall.

Northside: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT] or Contemporary Ethnic Studies 101: Introduction to Comparative Ethnic Studies [DIVR]. These courses are shared with neighboring Global Scholars Hall.

Olympia: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT] or Fine Arts 101: Introduction to Art [ARTS].

Orton: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT] or Fine Arts 101: Introduction Art [ARTS]. These courses are shared with neighboring Olympia Hall.

Regents: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT], Sociology 101: Introduction to Sociology [SSCI], or Entomology 101/103: Insects and People (with optional lab)[BSCI]. These courses are shared with Stimson, an all-male hall.

Rogers: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT], Music 161: Introduction to Theatre [ARTS], or Geology 101: Introduction to Geology [PSCI].

Scott/Coman: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT] or Environmental Science 101: The Environment, Human Life, and Sustainability [BSCI]. 

Stephenson Complex: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT] or English 101: Composition [WRTG]. 

Stevens:  History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT] or Human Development 101: Human Development across the Lifespan [SSCI].  These courses are shared with other Hillside residence halls.

Stimson:  History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT], Sociology 101: Introduction to Sociology [SSCI], or Entomology 101/103: Insects and People (with optional lab)[BSCI]. These courses are shared with Regents, an all-female hall.

Streit-Perham: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT], Geology 101: Introduction to Geology [PSCI], or English 101: Composition [WRTG].

Wilmer/Davis: History 105: Roots of Contemporary Issues [ROOT] or Human Development 101: Human Development across the Lifespan [SSCI].  These courses are shared with other Hillside residence halls.

Contract Appeal

The Contract Appeal Committee was created for the purpose of providing an avenue for students who have contractual problems that cannot be resolved through normal administrative channels. The Committee is comprised of students and administrators who meet on a regular basis.

If you would like to submit an appeal to the Housing and Dining Contract Appeals Committee, complete the online form at livingat.wsu.edu/contractappeal/

Please follow these directions:

  1. Make sure your appeal includes your name, WSU ID, and the address to which our response is to be sent.
  2. Clearly state the specific request you are making (i.e., release from contract without penalty, waiver of late fees, reversal of damage charges). Please read your contract carefully so you will know the specific clause you are appealing.
  3. Describe in detail and as clearly as possible the situation that led to the dispute. Please give hard facts (specific names, dates, times, etc.) and provide as much supportive material as possible. If appropriate, attach documents such as copies of your closing statement, doctor's statements on their letterhead, roommate or witness statements, etc. that will help the committee understand the reason for your appeal.
  4. Above all, show that extenuating circumstances exist in your case; things that were above and beyond your ability to predict and prevent.

Please submit your appeal online and watch for messages, sent to the email address you entered, from the committee as they ask questions, ask for additional documentation, and make a decision regarding your appeal. After the Committee meets to consider your appeal, you will be notified of its decision by email. If you have questions, please contact JoAnne Bryan at 509-335-7732.

Payment Policy

Residents are expected to keep their accounts current at all times. A full semester may be paid in advance or payments can be made on their contract/rental agreement published payment schedule. Residents who, for valid reasons, foresee difficulty meeting the published payment schedule are expected to contact Housing & Dining Financial Services at 509-335-8625 before the payment due date to work out a mutually agreeable alternative payment plan. We welcome your call and are eager to assist you.

For any student living in Residence Halls or Single Student Apartments, financial aid will automatically pay any excess funds (after tuition and fees have been paid) to Housing & Dining Financial Services, up to the amount due for the semester. Students who are experiencing delays in receiving financial aid or scholarship funds need to contact Housing & Dining Financial Services at 509-335-8625 to discuss their options prior to their account becoming delinquent.

Residents with poor credit history with Housing and Dining Financial Services may not be eligible for university housing. WSU Housing and Dining Financial Services reserves the right to deny future housing assignments to a resident with a history of more than one delinquency letter; more than one notice to vacate; cleaning, damage, and/or overdue charges in excess of $200; or, other factors that are indicative of poor credit history.